May. 12th, 2009

tishaturk: (book)
A couple of weeks ago I attended (and presented at) the IP/Gender Symposium at the American University Washington College of Law. It was a terrific experience. I was particularly happy about the opportunity to engage in ongoing conversation with a relatively limited number of people; most academic conferences have multiple panel streams, but IP/Gender had only one, so nearly everybody was able to attend all the presentations, which meant that as the day went on more and more presenters referenced earlier presentations. The organizers also allowed lots of time for discussion, which I really appreciated. And I got to hang out and chat with some delightful people, including a few I had met before (Francesca Coppa, Kristina Busse, and the ever-fabulous [livejournal.com profile] par_avion) and a great many more whom I was meeting for the first time (Rebecca Tushnet, Wendy Seltzer, Casey Fiesler [author of "Everything I Need to Know I Learned From Fandom: How Existing Social Norms Can Help Shape the Next Generation of User-Generated Content"], Karen Hellekson [TWC co-editor with Busse], and the other presenters).

For a detailed account of the presentations and ensuing discussions, I refer you to Professor Tushnet's blog; she posted her keynote address as well as notes from the first panel (which is the one I was on), the second panel, and the third panel.

All I can add is that the most eye-opening moment of the symposium for me personally was Ann Bartow's response to the first panel. She observed that everyone on that panel (including me) had framed fannish participation as a privilege that women ought to be allowed because we're not interfering with anybody's profits rather than as a right we can demand because everybody has a right to free speech. As Coppa put it later, we've been presenting ourselves as the Cinderellas who have picked all the lentils out of the ashes and are saying "Can I go to the fair use ball now?" when in fact we already have tickets to the ball because we're citizens. And Bartow's exactly right: defining fannish fair use as a form of free speech that we don't have to earn, that we can simply assert, had just... never occurred to me.

For anyone who's interested, I'm reproducing the text of my presentation under the cut. Like any text intended for performance, it changed a bit in delivery--I always end up ad-libbing or elaborating on points as I go; but the text that follows is what I had in front of me while I talked. It's based on the post on narrative from several months ago, so much of it will look familiar to anyone who's read that post, but it does include some new ideas--largely inspired by Coppa's "Swap Audio" presentation on Thursday night, in which she began to explore some of the ways in which we might theorize vidders' uses of music, not just video, as transformative--and I have given that section its own cut tag so that interested parties can skip right to it.

Transformative Narrations: Fan-made Videos and Fair Use )

how narrative theory might help us think about the audio elements of vids )
tishaturk: (book)
A couple of weeks ago I attended (and presented at) the IP/Gender Symposium at the American University Washington College of Law. It was a terrific experience. I was particularly happy about the opportunity to engage in ongoing conversation with a relatively limited number of people; most academic conferences have multiple panel streams, but IP/Gender had only one, so nearly everybody was able to attend all the presentations, which meant that as the day went on more and more presenters referenced earlier presentations. The organizers also allowed lots of time for discussion, which I really appreciated. And I got to hang out and chat with some delightful people, including a few I had met before (Francesca Coppa, Kristina Busse, and the ever-fabulous [livejournal.com profile] par_avion) and a great many more whom I was meeting for the first time (Rebecca Tushnet, Wendy Seltzer, Casey Fiesler [author of "Everything I Need to Know I Learned From Fandom: How Existing Social Norms Can Help Shape the Next Generation of User-Generated Content"], Karen Hellekson [TWC co-editor with Busse], and the other presenters).

For a detailed account of the presentations and ensuing discussions, I refer you to Professor Tushnet's blog; she posted her keynote address as well as notes from the first panel (which is the one I was on), the second panel, and the third panel.

All I can add is that the most eye-opening moment of the symposium for me personally was Ann Bartow's response to the first panel. She observed that everyone on that panel (including me) had framed fannish participation as a privilege that women ought to be allowed because we're not interfering with anybody's profits rather than as a right we can demand because everybody has a right to free speech. As Coppa put it later, we've been presenting ourselves as the Cinderellas who have picked all the lentils out of the ashes and are saying "Can I go to the fair use ball now?" when in fact we already have tickets to the ball because we're citizens. And Bartow's exactly right: defining fannish fair use as a form of free speech that we don't have to earn, that we can simply assert, had just... never occurred to me.

For anyone who's interested, I'm reproducing the text of my presentation under the cut. Like any text intended for performance, it changed a bit in delivery--I always end up ad-libbing or elaborating on points as I go; but the text that follows is what I had in front of me while I talked. It's based on the post on narrative from several months ago, so much of it will look familiar to anyone who's read that post, but it does include some new ideas--largely inspired by Coppa's "Swap Audio" presentation on Thursday night, in which she began to explore some of the ways in which we might theorize vidders' uses of music, not just video, as transformative--and I have given that section its own cut tag so that interested parties can skip right to it.

Transformative Narrations: Fan-made Videos and Fair Use )

how narrative theory might help us think about the audio elements of vids )

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Tisha Turk

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